361MC: – Final draft of Little Rag Doll music video, analysing my work & distribution

Above is the second and final draft of the music video for Little Rag Doll by Six Broken Sticks. I have added a disclaimer at the start of the video for the level of violence which was requested to be added by my tutor and I have also tightened up a few shots as per the band’s recommendations. I believe that this serves as a much more professional video as the last draft as the disclaimer shows a level of professionalism and practice that is used in mainstream music videos.

When looking at the video and analysing it, I have to ask the question as to whether it accomplishes what I originally set out do to and in what ways does it compare to both professional and amateur music videos in the same field of production. First off, any music video’s goal is to promote the band and the song and in this instance I feel that my music video has been a success. The band uploaded the video to Youtube on April 25th which has reached over 1000 views in the last 5 days as well as submitting the video onto BlankTV, which is another platform to submit music and videos, as well as LastFM.

http://www.last.fm/music/Six+Broken+Sticks

Six Broken Sticks also helped generate hype on their own Facebook page by releasing screenshots of the video a couple of weeks before the video was posted which allowed enabled a great amount of interest from their existing fans. Once the video was posted, the band re-published the video every few days incase any of their fans had missed it. On their latest re-posting there have also been fans asking when their next music video will be released, therefore showing that my music video has sparked a huge demand for this visual medium of their music in the future. The general consensus from the band and the fans are that my music video has been very well received which is nice to hear that my first music video I have ever filmed and edited managed to be somewhat successful in accomplishing the intended goal.

In terms of looking at my work in comparison to what others produce in the same field, I have to look at my work in comparison to professional mainstream music videos, as well as amateur music videos. When looking at the visual quality of the image of my video compared to the mainstream, my video is considerably lacking. This is because high-end music video productions have professional industry standard equipment totalling many thousands or sometimes even millions of dollars depending on how popular the artist is. As such, my video pales in comparison to music videos that you will currently see rotating on music channels due to the massively limited budget I had and fairly primitive equipment of three 5D cameras, tripods, shoulder mounts, three dedo lights and a glide track. Industry standard equipment for professional music video shoots often involve huge machine operated cameras, cranes and many powerful lights. Although I genuinely believe that me and my team did the utmost best with the equipment we had, the visual quality of the video itself is significantly lacking when put side by side with a mainstream music video. An example in my mind of a truly professional music video can be seen below:

However, in terms of music videos that you would find on Youtube made my amateur artists or the band’s themselves, I feel that the video is successful in both look, shot variation and editing. By comparing it to non-professional videos that are often made by the band’s themselves in order to further their online presence, it puts my video on the same playing field of equipment and budget. An example can be seen below of an amateur produced music video:

Comparing my video to one such as this allows me to have a lot more confidence in my product. The above video lacks any of the fast energy that is evoked in what is in my opinion a very good song. All of the shots are static with no momentum or sense of movement to enable the pace or power of the song to translate through into the video. Instead, camera shaking effects have been added in post which does not allow for the same effect. There are also a significant lack of variety of shots, which is usually understandable for amateur music videos, but ultimately feels repetitive and non-engaging to the viewer. The purpose of the music video aside from being a tool of promotion is to take the viewer on a visual experience which heightens the song and adds a visual picture to the attitude and ideas expressed in the song itself. This seems somewhat lost in this particular video, although the pace of the shots translates well to the song. With my video, I feel that the inclusion of the narrative helped the video stand out more from other amateur music videos that do not tend to bother or include one as the main focus is usually on the band itself and also allowed my video to have a fairly unique look to it. Whilst the band still featured prominently throughout, the balance between narrative and the band was always at the front of my mind during the editing process.

For all of these reasons, I acknowledge that my music video cannot reach the truly professional standard of videos in the mainstream due to a limited budget and lack of industry standard equipment, but I feel that in terms of editing and the time taken in bringing the narrative to life elevates it above the general standard of amateur videos that are typically self-made by the band themselves.

Unknown. 2009. Meat Loaf – I’d Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That). Available at: https://youtube.com/watch?v=9X_ViIPA-Gc %5BAccessed: 01 May 2014].

Unknown. 2011. ReinXeed – We Must Go Faster. Available at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=SSpw-yN4_hc [Accessed: 01 May 2014].

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s